Temi

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Contents

General

  • Teaching enquiry with mysteries incorporated
  • European science education project
  • addressed to secondary school teachers (math and science)
  • funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), category Capacities, Science in Society, Coordination Action.

Background

  • website, june, 2014

TEMI is a teacher training project with the aim to help transform science and mathematics teaching practice across Europe by giving teachers new skills to engage with their students, exciting new resources and the extended support needed to effectively introduce enquiry based learning into their classrooms.

We do this by working with teacher training institutions and teacher networks across Europe where we wish to implement innovative training programmes called ‘enquiry labs’. These are based around the core scientific concepts and emotionally engaging activity of solving mysteries, i.e. exploring the unknown. The enquiry labs use scientists and communication professionals (e.g. actors, motivational speakers, etc.) to mentor teachers through the transition to use enquiry to teach science.

TEMI adopts a clear definition of enquiry in terms of a cognitive skillset, and sets out a stepwise progression to push students towards becoming confident enquirers. The project pays equal attention to the affective side of learning. We will help teachers foster a deep motivation to learn, by bringing to the fore the sense of mystery, exploration and discovery that is at the core of all scientific practice.

  • Call identifier: FP7-SCIENCE-IN-SOCIETY-2012-1
  • Topic SiS.2012.2.2.1-1: Supporting actions on Innovation in the classroom: teacher training on inquiry based teaching methods on a large scale in Europe.

References


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